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It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 73 – Dr. Fiorella Terenzi

2017 sees us diving into the multi-verse with the great Dr. Fiorella Terenzi! Astrophysicist, Professor, Author and Musician – Fiorella blends so much knowledge and passion for the stars with her unique and poetic world view. Back in 1995 or so, Fiorella made some music with my dad that featured radio waves she captured from the galaxy and then transformed into soothing beats and melodies. We talked about that, bending the universe, the nature of space and time, black holes and why we must continue to look to the stars for our very survival. This was taped away from the cozy confines of the kitchen table in LA. It was taped live in Miami from her kitchen table! It was a wonderful, provocative and thought provoking interview. I’ve known Fiorella for 25 years and she’s always been one of the most creative thinkers in this and any other galaxy!

INTRO RANT: the change agents of our time

This episode is sponsored by Eat, Dream, Be. Head on over to eatdreambe.com/itsallhappening to learn more about these amazing neurotransmitters centered delectable food snacks.

Described by Time Magazine as “a cross between Carl Sagan and Madonna”, astrophysicist, author and recording artist Dr. Fiorella Terenzi received her doctorate in physics from the University of Milan, has studied opera and composition at Conservatory G. Verdi, and taught mathematics and physics at Liceo Scientifico, Milan. In research at the Computer Audio Research Laboratory, University of California, San Diego, she developed techniques to convert radio waves from galaxies into sound – released by Island Records on her acclaimed CD “Music from the Galaxies”.

Her Avon/HarperCollins book, “Heavenly Knowledge”, explores astronomy as a metaphor for human relationships and humanity’s place in the Universe. The book, covered on ABC Radio, NPR Talk of The Nation, BBC Radio, and The Sci-Fi Channel, has been translated into Italian (“Musica Dalle Stelle” released by Sperling-Kupfer and bundled with her music CD “Galactically Yours”), German (“Der Kosmos ist weiblich” released by Goldmann/Bertelsmann), Latvian and other languages.

“What I hope to do with my work is to bring back the sense of beauty and poetry to astronomy and science to inspire a new connection with the Universe”
Dr. Fiorella Terenzi

Dr. Terenzi wrote the foreword for Paula Berinstein’s recent book “Making Space Happen: Private Space Efforts and the People Behind Them” (Plexus Books) and has been featured in full chapter in Laura Woodmansee’s “Women of Space: Cool Careers on the Final Frontier” (Apogee Books) and the music and techonolgy book “The Art of Digital Music” by Kelli Richards and David Battino. She also provided a technical review of the educational text book “The Physics of Every Day Phenomena” by Thomas Griffith (McGraw-Hill), “College Physics” and “Physics for the Life Sciences” by Kesten/Tauck (Freedman). She has taught astronomy and physics at Glendale College, Pierce College (Los Angeles), Pace University (New York), Borough of Manhattan Community College and Bronx Community College (City University of NY, New York), Eastern Florida State College (Cocoa, FL) and is a full-time Instructor of Astronomy and Physics at Florida International University (www.FIU.edu).

www.fiorella.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 62 – Trevor Hall

Trevor stopped by the kitchen table for this truly inspiring episode of IAH. Trevor’s gift to the world is his song but what transpires through his music, being and soul is so much more. Like so many of the great artists who came before him, Trevor is thoughtful, smart, intuitive, aware and you get the feeling when talking to him that he’s seeing the world in the way that others are not. Our conversation ranged from his early days and upbringing, spirituality in life and music, why love really does heal all wounds and the quest to constantly explore and be a seeker. I’m somewhat of a late convert to Trevor’s music and am so grateful that I get to discover this well of brilliance at this point in life.

INTRO RANT – When did anti-intellcualism and the celebration of ignorance become the norm?

From trevorhallmusic.com:

As an eleven year old, playing harmonica beside his father in South Carolina, music quickly became Trevor’s most intimate companion, guide and creative outlet. In his elementary years, he began to write his own songs and perform them locally. At sixteen he recorded his first record, and the following year he left South Carolina to study classical guitar at Idyllwild Arts Academy, an international boarding school east of Los Angeles. There, Trevor was introduced to yoga and certain spiritual practices found in India, which greatly influenced his music and his life journey. During his senior year, Trevor signed a record deal with Geffen Records and his career as a musician formally began.

Trevor quickly broke through the music scene, with such early accomplishments in his career as having a song recorded on the Shrek the Third soundtrack, as well as joining a series of sold-out tours with artists such as Steel Pulse, The Wailers, Jimmy Cliff, Matisyahu, Michael Franti, SOJA, Brett Dennen and Colbie Callait. Trevor’s quick rise on the scene, however, was ripe with challenges that conflicted with his spiritual life and devotional practice. In order to parallel his life’s path with the messages in his music, Trevor moved into a traditional Hindu ashram in Southern California in 2008. When not on tour, he lived as a monk and devoted his days to spiritual practice and service. His involvement with the temple affected his music and his music quickly became his practice.

www.trevorhallmusic.com

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It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 51 – Andy Summers

It’s the It’s All Happening one year anniversary!! And to mark the occasion we have a very special guest in the form of Andy Summers. I dropped by Andy’s studio in Venice, CA to record the episode and what followed was pure podcast magic. You, of course, know Andy as the guitarist for the iconic band The Police but going beyond those magical years he’s continued to make his mark as one of the worlds most acclaimed, thoughtful and original guitarists who defies classification. Our one hour conversation wove it’s away around the topics of craftsmanship within music, finding ones role in life, what the culture of mid 60’s UK and our overall shared love for music. We journeyed through his career somewhat chronologically to cover his work with Robert Fripp, his jazz albums, his last album Metal Dog and of course The Police. If you’re a fan of music of any kind this episode is for you. Andy is truly a remarkable mind, kind soul and unreal talent.

Andy Summers is known as the guitarist for the rock band The Police, he has also recorded twelve solo albums, collaborated with many other artists, toured extensively under his own name, published several books, and composed several film scores.

Purchase Andy’s last album Metal Dog by CLICKING HERE

www.andysummers.com

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It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 46 – Elliot Mintz

Hollywood, the counter culture, media and rock and roll has produced many characters over the years. All of whom have formed the fabric of our culture. Elliot Mintz stands out as of one of those greats who, in my opinion, is one of the great cultural anthropologists of our time. This podcast was done in his living room as we waxed poetic about the early days of celebrity culture in 1963, the innocence that surrounded that time, spiritual integrity, John Lennon, Bob Dylan and so much more. I found this interview to be one of the most fascinating and engrossing I’ve ever done. Also, note that Elliot has one of the great voices and most articulate delivery systems ever. Enjoy.

NOTE – very long into rant about Brexit and the illusion of separation.

Elliot Mintz is an American media consultant and publicist. In the 1960s and early 1970s Mintz was an underground radio DJ and host. In the 1970s he became a spokesperson for John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and took on other musicians and actors as clients as a publicist ranging from Bob Dylan to Diana Ross.

www.elliotmintz.com

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It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 29 – Shiva Baum

The mayor of all things great, my good friend, rock and roll master shaman and Bhakti legend Shiva Baum comes by to do an episode of IAH. We explore friendship, kirtan and The Church of Rock and Roll and why it still matters.

NOTE: a VERY long Amanda Chantal Bacon intro rant is included. Skip to 10:22 if you want to miss out on all the fun.

Shiva Baum has enjoyed a lifelong love affair with music. When he was 19 he began an internship at New York’s Sony Music Studios followed by a summer at Columbia Records under the mentorship of then head of A&R David Khane and has never looked back from there. Shiva went on to discover and develop 90’s alt rock band VAST who then signed with Elektra Records. Under the tutelage of Raghu Markus, Shiva then transitioned to influential world music label Triloka Records which was a division of Mercury/Polygram. Eventually Shiva became head of A&R working closely with Krishna Das, Jai Uttal and Bhagavan Das as well other world music artists including the Native American gospel group Walela and southern Cuban salsa phenoms Bio Ritmo. Shiva then headed over to Gold Circle records as VP of A&R developing new artists in tandem with working on new releases by seasoned 80’s superstars John Waite and Pat Benatar. He has been mentored by industry luminaries Rick Rubin, Danny Goldberg, Jeff Ayeroff, and David Silver. Currently, Shiva is an artist manager, producer and “A&R coach” working closely with new artists BIRA, Brightside, and Clark Graham amongst others following his passion to discover and develop new talent. In addition, he is the main stage MC and head of music programming at the “Coachella of Kirtan” known as Bhakti Fest in Joshua Tree, CA. Shiva is very looking forward to the launch of a sacred music focussed podcast which he’ll be hosting this year.

https://www.facebook.com/shiva.baum

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It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 8 – Jason Bentley

Jason Bentley came over to the podcast table (yes it’s a table) at Zach’s house to spend some time talking about KCRW, Los Angeles, the importance of music in life and how the musical landscape is changing right before our very eyes.

Jason is the host of KCRW’s “Morning Becomes Eclectic” and also serves as the stations music director.

“I think being passionate about music and culture is fundamentally what enables me to be successful. I’m driven to share that excitement, whether it’s DJ’ing at an art exhibit, working on a film project, or broadcasting from the radio station every day. It gives me a real sense of purpose.”

That purpose has taken shape growing up at KCRW, beginning as a phone volunteer the summer after high school, scoring a nighttime air shift in 1992 with Metropolis running for 16 years, and ultimately being promoted to music director of the station.

www.kcrw.com

@jason_bentley

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SOPA vs. The Mash Up Generation

A piece ran in Slate the other day that proclaimed passing SOPA would lead to an economic and social disaster. Click here to read that post.

It’s a fantastic look at how the socia-economic sensibilities have changed considerably in the last decade and the movement of copyright infringement has helped to shape this brave new world. I disagree with the overly simplistic view that states that the entertainment industries revenue has not been offset from online piracy. It is a fact that the record sales are down 60% in the last decade. One might argue that’s a good thing – the scam of charging $18 for a full length record that’s only 20% good was akin to forcing you to go into Disneyland with only 2 or 3 of the rides working. Now, the consumer can choose to buy as much or as little of an album as they want. And there is direct proof that if the whole album is good, people will buy it. Quality rises to the top and people respond. Refer to Adelle or Mumford and Sons for evidence of that. Of course there’s another, somewhat more complicated, side. In today’s media savvy world there’s a whole generation that simply types in “Mediafire Mumford and Sons” into Google to acquire new music. Easy. Two or three clicks and it’s done.

Some experts say the psychological subtly that a music file is only a few megabytes and is so easily shared (stolen) that it really doesn’t amount to stealing in the first place. It’s just sharing your stuff with your friends. It’s the same as viewing a non authorized video on YouTube or borrowing a book like the Slate piece talks about. Most people under 25 would say this is true, digital music feels intangible thus it doesn’t hold any concrete place in the material world. It’s just a file that can be passed on over and over again. The thought doesn’t even occur to most kids that effort and money went into producing said file and thus it does actually hold monetary value. All true but I think it goes deeper than that.

If we look back at the previous few decades they all have a very concrete stamp on how they can be defined. The 60’s were a time of social unrest and revolution, the 70s were groovy and had disco, the 80s were the MTV generation and the 90s had grunge and the birth of the web. Each era can be very succinctly defined. Can the same be said of the 2000’s? Sort of but not really.

The 2000s saw the rise of the iPod, Facebook and YouTube. Those are certainly three pilars that this generation can be proud of and no doubt forever changed the way we live. However, take a look at the core value that each one of those three products has to offer. The iPod allows you to store tons of the aforementioned intangible digital files of music that inherently encourages you to just plug your iPod into a friends computer and go wild taking whatever you want. Facebook is a tool that has changed the way we communicate and stay in touch but it’s also largely a forum for people to share other peoples content that they love without thinking about it. How many times a week do I see a rare Pink Floyd clip posted over and over again? Lots. And then there’s YouTube – the mothership of them all. YouTube has essentially created a cultural conversation that is based on the mash-up. People taking others peoples work and slicing it up into new work. It’s a blender of cultural vernacular, music, iconic images, acting without any SAG card and all around power to the people creativity. That’s what the 2000’s was – it was the decade for mashing-up and sharing stuff that moves us. It’s defined this generation.

The 1990’s gave rise to this anarchic uncontrollable giant of the World Wide Web. It, accidentally, became the last free dimension where there is no police force and is completely egalitarian. SOPA would add a layer to this that is so contrary to it’s DNA that it would disrupt what can not be disrupted. Additionally, to me more importantly, it would change the cultural conversation that made the 2000s (and now the 2010’s) so great. Our favorite viral videos would be subject to government regulation. Blogs could not freely publish half of what they do. Girl Talk could not make his genius albums and most of all the kids could not simply share the stuff they love and make into their own cultural statement. SOPA would start a war with an entire generation that has made mash-ups and the appropriation of content into a unique voice all their own.

I understand that the entertainment business is scared of lost revenue and needs to react to that somehow. I don’t have a point of view on that. But I do know that the music business, particularly the musicians, are going to go through a radical shift in their place in society. A friend of mine and I often talk about how modern society will hold a place for the professional musician from here on out. We think that todays musician will go back to their roots of how it used to be. I don’t mean how it used to be in the 1950s. I mean how it used to be in the 1890s. The musician will once again become the village bard that expresses our core emotions simply because they have no choice. They will once again become the story tellers who are passing on myths of the generation simply because their dharma calls for it. Very few will now do it for the seductive draw of money and fame. Surely there will still be a few of those but mostly todays musician will contribute into the modern tech laden social mash-up because it’s a damn good thing to do. The economic model how to make it as a musician still needs some things answered but the sentiment of this modern world of free roaming content will be a good thing in the long run.