It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 115 – Christine Mason

Our collective podcast audible journey collides head on with the dharmic brilliance of Christine Mason. She is a force of nature who dances her away through the multi-verse with ease, grace, wisdom and a whole lot of creation. Our conversation traversed many landscapes including technology, running companies and business, spiritual practice, refining ones dharma, how to create more compassionate working environments and a look at the state of yoga in the west. YES, we really did cover that much ground. Additionally, Christine shared with us her experience of how she re-adapted her lifes work based on a psychedelic spiritual experience that changed her life instantly.

Christine’s state of being in the world is truly remarkable and being with her can hover between inspiration and intimidation. She’s extremely accomplished and constantly flowing with new ideas and energy. In my opinion, Christine is the model for the 21st Century woman. Enjoy the episode!

INTRO RANT – A look at dharma

This episode of the podcast is brought to you by The Timothy Leary Project a new book by Jennifer Ulrich, published by Abrams Books.

Christine Mason

Christine serves as a Board Member for Now Labs, doing early stage technology strategy, advising and investing.  She’s the founder & President of Rosebud, a V-beauty line.  She is the Editor-in-Chief of Enter Magazine, Investigating Technology and Human Culture, and the co-founder of New Earth Hawaii, a center for yoga and human potential on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Her books include:  Indivisible: Coming Home to True Connection (2016) and Bending the Bow: The Common Story of Great Activists (upcoming, 2018), and the editor of the poetry anthology Love in the Face of Everything. She is a Board Member at Insight Out, driving for restorative justice in California’s Prisons, and at the Stone Research Foundation, improving the future of the human body.

She’s a mom of 6 and a grandmother, a 20 year+ yogi and bhakta.  You can find more of her writing on Human Potential and Yoga, Music and Spoken Word at XtineM.com

Her prior work includes founding and growing multiple venture backed technology companies, and mapping new markets for emerging technologies for leading companies such as AutoDesk, Panasonic and Estee Lauder. Areas of investigation include technologies as far ranging as markets for biologic patents, short and midterm potentials for synthetic biology applications, 3D printing, unmanned aerial vehicles, cloud computing, big data, video analytics, and more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 114 – Duncan Trussell (MAPS Podcast 26)

This episode of the IAH podcast is actually a double dipping orgasmic sonic podcast co-share with the MAPS Podcast (www.maps.opg). The interview with Duncan was so good, of course, that I felt compelled to use it for both shows that I host. What can be said about a talk with Duncan? Not much that hasn’t been said before however, since this episode was recorded for the MAPS show it’s focus is primarily on psychedelics. Duncan is one of the smartest psychonauts in the multi-verse and is no doubt one of the finest representatives for the power and potential of psychedelics. Enjoy!

INTRO RANT – On John Perry Barlow

This episode of the podcast is brought to you by The Timothy Leary Project a new book by Jennifer Ulrich, published by Abrams Books.

Duncan Trussell is a comedian, psychonaut and host of the wildly popular Duncan Trussell Family Hour

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

People

On Barlow

Throughout the course of any one person’s life there are sure to be a few key people that show up as agents of transformation. People who help to define the myriad of essential moments that shape your journey into one that has direction, purpose and meaning. I have my parents Timothy and Barbara, a couple of romantic relationships, many close friends and my teachers that I’ve known personally as well as in the astral. Within that mix, nestled deep in the roots of my formative years, resides John Perry Barlow. I say this with the utmost conviction and gratitude. I’d be a different person than I am today had I never crossed paths with Barlow.

Barlow entered my life 30 years ago when I was 14 years old. I was just a gangly confused teenager trying to find my way in the world. During the span of these 30 years there were phases in my relationship with Barlow where we’d be in each other’s orbit frequently and fondly, possibly sharing a laugh at a trademark “Barlow Frenzy.” Alternatively, many years could also pass, sometimes awkwardly, that would eventually come to an end in the form of a loving reunion. It must be said that certain elements of my time with Barlow could contain their fair share of complex tensions having to do with the very strong personalities of both my family and his being. That’s not to say any of it had a lasting effect. They were gracefully balanced out with countless intimate moments of dancing in each other’s consciousness that could only be achieved by Barlow’s brilliance at understanding complex eco-systems and then knowing how to rebuild them.

Nostalgically, I recall many moments where my Deadhead-ness would take over and I’d barrage him with my curiosity about the inner workings of the Grateful Dead. That was hard to shake with me. Remember, I met Barlow when I was a 14-year-old fan and a kid, so the context of our friendship evolved over time. For the first 10 years he was more of a “god-uncle”, as he put it, intent on exposing me to the wonders of the world through his unique lens. He knew that my household was kind of “different” and that I could use an extra set of adult eyes helping me out to make sure I didn’t go further astray. Growing up, I was so blessed to have some of the greatest guest stars one could ever imagine, but it wasn’t always easy for me to connect with them. The stage was so large, and I tried so hard to be smart and liked, that I often fumbled because I was also in the midst of screeching through the baffling process of growing up. Barlow made it easy, he made any bullshit go away. He was always so comforting, funny and gracious with the way he could make me feel safe and included. He’d come into my room and crouch down next to me as we geeked out on Mac IIci games or to dial up to The Well to unearth the possibilities of what was to come. Cowboy boots always on of course.

I didn’t spend as much time with Barlow over the years as many did nor did I spend the least. I’m no authority on his life and legacy, however, due to the memorable intensity of the time I did spend with him things tended to morph from mundane moments to thrilling events that left stamps on my consciousness for life. Everything he did was full on.

Perhaps, the most special quality of his was the way he could set the stage for glorious potential. When you were with Barlow you got the feeling that THIS night could be the greatest night of your life. Anything could happen. His thirst for stirring the pot with forward thinking ideas, for bringing people together, for seducing women and all while weaving the mischief of the Grateful Dead ethos into the mixture made for the perfect conditions for an atmosphere of magic. Only someone with his brand of unmistakable ego and intellect could be a ring leader of this magnitude.

At first, and this is true, my folks and I used to laugh uncontrollably at Barlow’s relentless ego and need to speak in the third person. Before email was a regular thing, we’d get “BarlowGrams” in the mail. My dad would be like “who does this guy think he is? Who the fuck cares what he’s doing?” The thing is, our acerbic tongues and judgement eventually went out the window because his sincerity and authenticity could not be denied. We’d came around. Even grouchy ol’ Timmy saw Barlow was doing amazing stuff, gathered fantastic people for parties and was actually worth following in his branded email updates. His finger was many levels above being “on the pulse”, he was creating a new pulse. Barlow was a social media brand 15 years before any of us were trying to do the same thing. Fact.

Also, like my dad, Barlow’s ability to reinvent himself was the stuff of legends. If you plot the logic of a Wyoming cattle rancher Dead lyricist changing professions mid-stream to that of an Internet freedom fighter philosopher, you’ll get lost and confused. It was a brilliant transformation that defied convention.

For me though, I was a Deadhead first and foremost, that was my main lifeline to him. In my eyes his place in the world was part of that formula. When the Mondo 2000 era was booming and the EFF was forming, Barlow’s voice as a freedom fighter on the plains of cybernetic consciousness was visionary and a sight to behold. But it never moved me in the same way because I was much more interested in learning about how “Throwing Stones” came to life. That’s just who I am I guess. I am thrilled that his desire to be remembered as an Information Age visionary is what’s leading the headlines in public obits. Look Barlow, you did it! I think the NY Times didn’t even mention the Dead in depth for 3 paragraphs.

He was a maverick until the end.

Death has no mercy. That much is true. Barlow’s slow burn into formlessness was rough. In the last couple of years, it pained me to see him to be honest. Still, it was reflective of way he lived – full on, hard, gritty, vulnerable and always up for adventure. For a cowboy from Wyoming, Barlow was one of the most sensitive guys I’d ever come across. From an early age he was an example to me of how a man could show emotion with pride. His death encapsulated those notes as well. He lived and died on the edge with a hunger to seize every moment and to make them into epic tales of ragged glory. Many of his greatest songs he wrote with Weir illustrate that part of him.

The Weir/Barlow cannon makes up many of the most cherished Dead songs in my opinion. At any given show I was just as happy to hear “Let it Grow” as I was “Scarlet Begonias” – I was full on with Bobby and not solely a Jerry freak. Barlow’s contribution to the Dead zeitgeist, while not as prolific as Hunter’s, was an essential part of the fabric. He helped to paint the tapestry of one of Rock n Roll’s most important legacies.

All this aside, this post isn’t about praising his accomplishments. Many will do that better than I will. Not to mention the fact that his accomplishments are obvious and speak for themselves.

This is about family. Barlow was a core part of the Leary family and many of its dimensions. His presence during the last 9 years of Timothy’s life was not subtle. He formed a friendship with Timothy the best anyone really could. Anyone who saw the two of them together remembers fondly their battles of oratory and quiet battle to see who could own the room. That being true, I have to say now that he made a mistake by getting in too deep when Timothy and my mother Barbara were headed for splitsville. His penchant for the spotlight and unquenchable attraction to powerful women helped create a set of circumstances that I wish didn’t happen. They come complete with gossip and intrigue that in the end left some scars. All the details aren’t important but it’s a tough sting when someone crosses the line with your own mother and claims to have had a relationship with her that simply was not true. That was always looming in the back of my head even decades after, it was hard to shake. The crowning bit of poetic irony is that Barlow being the way he is, made it so that I somehow could look passed it and just keep on dancing. Hard to explain I guess. As times goes on, I find many of the great long-term friendships in one’s life can also get complex and that’s just fine. It makes them rich and special.

My intention of bringing this up is not to add scars to his legacy, the point is that he was family and things got that intimate. With family comes many nuances, ins and outs and various sets of baggage. It’s how any family operates. He played hard and wasn’t afraid to go all in. That I admire. And for that I love him.

He also gave me what I felt was too harsh a dose of tough love during a time when I was in my addiction and faulted by making some poor choices (to say the least.) I felt that doing it publicly wasn’t the right move considering his way of life and penchant for hard living wasn’t always the best example to follow. Still, he meant well and always wanted me to shine. Additionally, I have to admit that his knack for not being subtle may have actually benefited me in this case. Essentially, his contradictions were part of his charm. I mean, how could you love a sometimes Mormon Republican Bohemian Grove member Grateful Dead lyric writing acid head? You just could. Because he was the only one of that kind.

He had so much to offer the world and many people as well, I’m lucky that I got even a shred of it. I can’t think of a smarter, more generous and more worldlier profound person that I’ve ever known. The world is a sadder place without him.

Like I said earlier, magic with him was always possible and even frequent. My top 3 memories of Barlow infused magic are as follows:

1.) Pink Floyd 1994 – this story could be an entire book. The last night he spent with his beloved Cynthia Horner happened to be at our house in 1994 the same weekend that Pink Floyd was playing at the Rose Bowl. Gilmour was a friend, so that weekend of shows saw our house turned into a launchpad for the shows, dozens of people gathered up there before the trek to Pasadena. Barlow and Cynthia too – they exchanged beams of love, possibly took something and then transported with all of us at the Floyd show. From what we all understood they had an amazing night and sealed their bond. Tragically, the very next day Cynthia passed away on an airplane in her sleep only hours after Barlow took her to LAX. It goes without saying that he was never the same and the un-calculable grief that came as a result was his work for the remainder of his life. While sad, the profound connection with his loss fused with magic of Pink Floyd all while using our house as the playing ground is something I’ll never forget. For years after that, every time I saw him I could not escape the image of that weekend.

2.) Brent Mydlands death – I was only 16 but Barlow called our house the day Brent died of an overdose in 1990. Or maybe Timmy called him after I explained why Barlow’s relationship with Brent was special. I’m not sure. After talking to my dad for a while I was handed the phone to give my condolences. I wasn’t sure why, what could I possibly say? I had gone to over 40-50 shows in the previous two years and because of that and my age it was very hard to put it all into context and to come from my heart. I did my best and we stayed on the phone for probably 15 minutes, which I thought was a lot back then. With effortless grace the lessons, wisdom and perspective that I got from talking to Barlow that day left a deep canyon of love in my soul. It was one of the earliest confrontations with death that I experienced. There I was talking to a guy about his friend and song writing partner who just died. He blew my mind and also set the stage for many more encounters with death that I’d walk through over the years. This was new territory for me not to mention a deeply sad and surreal example. Footnote – The Grateful Dead were essentially never the same after that. They rebounded a little with Hornsby but that 87-90 peak was the last of its magnitude.

3.) ACLU Benefit – I believe the year was 1997. It wasn’t long after Timmy had checked out and I use that as context because many of the Leary.com team was still hanging out together and we were Barlow’s guests that evening. In addition, Bob Weir and Rob Wasserman were the musical guests to compliment the honoring of Barlow by the ACLU. The event was at the Century Plaza Hotel in LA and Barlow thought it would be a grand idea to make the entire evening into a post Leary-drome memorial gathering fused with a classic BarlowFrenzy that was to take place in his hotel room. It wasn’t quite the case in terms of size but after the event and a classic mini-set by Bob and Rob, Weir joined myself and some of the other Leary-folk in a psychedelic dance around the cosmos. It was so special for me personally because Jerry hadn’t been gone long and Bobby was still marinating in the haze and was quite candid in talking about it. The combination of that and the psychedelic exploration was a night to remember. Classic Barlow magic.

There are so so many more. But that feels about right.

Shine on John. I’ll miss you. Thank you for everything. Thank you for being a pain in the ass. For challenging me. For teaching me. For making me laugh. For countless Dead tickets. And for not being successful at hooking up with my mother. Having you as a step dad would have been too much. See you on the other side.

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 113 – Cory Allen

The Astral Hustle’s very own Cory Allen beams into IAH to take us on a journey of dealing with the full range of modern life’s complexities with grace, poise and meditative focus. Cory is diligently working on his new book , “Now Is The Way”, and through that launch pad we explored the myriad of topics the book covers. We talked about how to combat the static of the technological age with awareness and meditation, the unique challenges our time is facing, why mediation is more important than ever before and why it might be a good idea to back off from the over philosophicalization of our existence. Cory is a great thinker, mediation guide and emerging leader for the modern age.

INTRO RANT – Jordan Peterson – the rise and casting watchful eye

Cory Allen has taught thousands of people how to meditate in group workshops and through his online meditation course Release Into Now. He explores ideas on consciousness, mindfulness and the human condition on his weekly podcast The Astral Hustle, which has been downloaded over 1 million times. He’s written a book on living in the present moment titled Now is the Way, which will be published by Penguin Random House in late 2018. Cory is a composer who has released over a dozen albums, and is a renowned audio engineer with 15 years of experience.

www.cory-allen.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 112 – Shayna Hiller

Episode 112 of the IAH podcast dives head first into the grace and wisdom found on the path of yoga. Shayna Hiller drops by the kitchen table to share her intoxicating, intelligent and refreshingly unique take on the science of yoga and shares her approach to teaching it. Our podcast covers some of the wisdom that she’s obtained from the completely colorful one-of-a-kind adventure that is her life. This is someone who spent years in the jungles of Costa Rica embarking on a monastic path of self inquiry that many great masters have done before her. Her reintegration back into the material world brings with her magic and energy that define the kind of wellness teacher she is. Our conversation went deep into all of this and more – Shayna truly is a remarkable soul who will break your soul open with light by just being in her presence!

INTRO RANT – Shyamdas – 5 years later

Shayna Hiller is a yoga teacher and certified Health Coach based in Venice Beach, California. She is the author of ‘Don’t Judge Me By My Cover‘.  Travel nomad turned Health and Business Coach, her intuitive spiritual guidance coupled with  offers her clients a comprehensive holistic method for reclaiming optimal health. Through years of professional training, her approach goes beyond mainstream coaching to reveal the root causes of various health and life concerns including emotional eating, anxiety, depression, relationships and career. She has the acute intelligence and articulation to discuss complex topics related to health, which is why many people benefit from her teachings. Her light-hearted, authentic approach to healing is truly one of a kind.

www.shaynahiller.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 111 – Amanda Yates Garcia

The first episode of 2018 whirls in with pagan wisdom and Goddess power of Amanda Yates Garcia otherwise known as “The Oracle of Los Angeles.” Amanda is a witch by birth, profession and soul. She’s out to bring light, healing and knowledge to all those that seek her expertise. We did this podcast in person at the kitchen table and I’ll confirm that her force field is powerful, seductive and extremely thought provoking. Our conversation dove into many mystical nooks and crannies surrounding the world today coupled with practical witchy suggestions for applying magic into ones own life. Amanda’s perspective into how society and consciousness fuse together with the elements of the physical world is truly remarkable. I learned so much from this one, there must be a part 2 someday. If you’re at all curious about how a modern day witch operates and thrives in today’s world look no further.

INTRO RANT – New Year, New Everything

Amanda Yates Garcia – Growing up in a pagan household my magical education started young; I learned to read the tarot and made my own set of runes before I entered my teens; my great grandmother read palms and tea leaves, and I share the same family tree as Edgar Cayce.

Today I draw from a broad range of esoteric strategies including the Western Mystery Traditions of tarot, alchemy and Hermeticism; shamanic healing practices; positive magic and witchcraft; herbalism; energy work (Reiki, tantra and other yogas); psychomagic and more.

Throughout my years as a magical practitioner, I’ve given countless tarot readings; spent months at Zen monasteries; given lectures on Witchcraft at ESMOA, UC Irvine, Cal State Pomona and UCLA; received my Reiki Master initiation from Tibetan monk Tenzin Lama Sherpa; studied Holotropic Breathwork with Michael Stone and have received a certification in breathwork by David Elliott; and trained in shamanic healing techniques with Amanda Foulger of the Foundation for Shamanic Studies. I also have a BFA in Dance Theatre from University College of London, and an MFA in Writing/Critical Theory and Film/Video from California Institute of the Arts.

Visit: oracleoflosangeles.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 110 with David Silver

There is nothing quite like tripping the light fantastic with David Silver. Episode 110 of the podcast brings David back to the show in the form of an exploration into our world today that only David can present. Our talk did dance in the political arena for a bit solely out of the desire to examine the surrealist schism that it is. We also talked about the passing of Siddhi Ma, our changing relationship with media, the success of the 60’s, the protest movement and rock and roll. David is one of the finest minds on the planet today. Enjoy.

INTRO RANT – Remembering Siddhi Ma

This episode is sponsored by Belle Sante Beauty

David Silver started his innovative media career in the late sixties hosting WGBH-TV’s “What’s Happening Mr. Silver?” David’s 1979 Warner Brothers feature “No Nukes” helped start the whole trend of music/activism feature documentaries.

He also wrote the Billboard #1 MGM film, “The Compleat Beatles” the biopic movie of choice about history’s most famous band. David has worked with Bruce Springsteen, Bob Marley, Ringo Starr, Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Roger Waters and many others. He has created dozens of CD’s and movies, including pairing Allen Ginsberg with Paul McCartney, and producing the film biography of Timothy Leary. In 2009, David was the consultant to Ang Lee, the Academy Award-winning director, on his Universal/Focus Features release, “Taking Woodstock.” Since 2006, he has also been writing, directing and consulting with Ram Dass’s Love Serve Remember Foundation and, in 2012, directed the “Cultivating Loving Awareness” documentary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's All Happening Podcast

IAH – Episode 109 – Bruce Margolin

For 50 years Bruce Margolin has been leading the charge for the reform of marijuana laws in California through this law practice and policy stewardship. To say he is a legend in the world of counter culture criminal defense law is an understatement. He is truly one of the great personalities, thinkers and leaders of our time. Our conversation covered so much of the rich tapestry of his life, journey, the state of cannabis laws and a very special detour. That detour comes in the form of this: in 1972 Bruce was the attorney for Tim Leary in his prison escape case. The time he spent with Timothy and the stories he tells are essential in forming a complete picture of the Leary saga. You can’t make this stuff up. Tune into this episode to go on a journey into one of the most fascinating lives and front row seats that you’ll ever come across.

INTRO RANT – Net Neutrality

This episode is sponsored by Belle Sante Beauty

Bruce M. Margolin has over 40 years experience in defending the rights of his clients. He is equally as passionate at working to reform laws he believes to be unjust. To that end, Mr. Margolin is also the Director of the Los Angeles chapter of NORML (National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws) and has been so for over 30 years.

www.420laws.com